Tag: psychology

  • New Preprint: Does it Actually Feel Right?

    New Preprint: Does it Actually Feel Right?

    In a recent post, I mentioned a replication study we performed. We have now finalised the manuscript and uploaded it as a pre-print to PsyArXiv. Update (25.04.2018): The paper is now published at Royal Society Open Science and available here.

  • Thoughts on the Universality of Psychological Effects

    Most discussed and published findings from psychological research claim universality in some way. Especially for cognitive psychology it is the underlying assumption that all human brains work similarly — an assumption not unfounded at all. But also findings from other fields of psychology such as social psychology claim generality across time and place. It is […]

  • Michael Inzlicht on loosing faith in science

    Michael Inzlicht on loosing faith in science

    Michael Inzlicht has posted an article on his blog about how he lost faith in psychological science after reading the now infamous paper on “false-positive psychology”. It is interesting for me to note that my experience is somewhat different.

  • Choosing Cut-Offs in Tests

    Choosing Cut-Offs in Tests

    My last blog post was on the difference between Sensitivity, Specificity and the Positive Predictive Value. While showing that a positive test result can represent a low probability of actually having a trait or a disease, this example used the values of Sensitivity and Specificity as pre-known input. For established tests and measures they indeed […]

  • Replicability, Data Quality and Bayesian Methods

    On the About page I wrote, that I blog about things I come across while researching for my PhD. So, you may very well ask what this PhD is supposed to be about. For the interested reader — researchers and the uninitiated alike —, here is some overview on my current plans and research focus.

  • ASA statement on p-Values: Improving valid statistical reasoning

    A lot of debate (and part of my thesis) revolve around replicability and the proper use of inferential methods. The American Statistical Association has now published a statement on the use and the interpretation of p-Values (freely available, yay). It includes six principles and how to handle p-Values. None of them are new in a theoretical […]

  • Mixing up Standard Errors and Standard Deviations

    Over at the Non Significance blog, the author describes the case of a paper that has some strange descriptive statistics: What surprised me were the tiny standard deviations for some of the Variable 1 and 2, especially in combination with the range given. In the blog post, the author outlines his approach to make sense […]

  • Two retractions as end of investigation

    The German Society of Psychology (DGPs) today announced that the court of honor has put an end to its investigation on Jens Förster after they mutually agreed to the retraction of two papers in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General:1 By this [agreement] the proceedings against Prof. Dr. Jens Förster at the court of honor at the […]